New fishing rules aim to curb great white shark hunting – Orange County Register

Gov. Gavin Newsom recently signed new legislation adding regulations to curb hunting of great white shark species, also known as great white sharks, which should also make the water safer for humans.

The new rules, effective January 1, place additional restrictions on the use of bait, bait, and bait to attract a great white shark. The law, sponsored by Santa Barbara Rep. Steve Bennett, aims to deter activities that may lead to increased interactions between great white sharks and humans.

The new rules also give law enforcement agencies more tools to protect great white sharks from intentional attempts to capture or lure them, and protect the public from interactions with great white sharks caught unintentionally by fishermen, according to a press release from the California Department of Fish and Wildlife , when and where to use chum and shark bait.

On Wednesday, November 22, 2017, a 6-foot great white shark was snapped off San Clemente Pier. New regulations limit the use of shark gear or mates to attract great white sharks. (Screenshot from the video by Scott Shipley)
On Wednesday, November 22, 2017, a 6-foot great white shark was snapped off San Clemente Pier. New regulations limit the use of shark gear or mates to attract great white sharks. (Screenshot from the video by Scott Shipley)

Adds prohibition on using shark decoy, shark decoy, or shark lure to attract a great white shark to the California Fish and Game Code. Also, putting shark bait or buddies into the water is prohibited within one nautical mile of shorelines, piers or jetties when a great white shark is visible or known to be present.

“Sharks are one of California’s most recognizable marine species, and it is our responsibility to ensure their populations are preserved,” Bennett said in the announcement. “At the same time, public safety is of paramount importance.”

Great white sharks have been protected by state and federal regulations since 1994 and must be released immediately if accidentally caught, according to the CDFW. Under these protections, it is illegal to capture, track, hunt, capture or kill a great white shark, including intentionally luring a great white shark with bait or other methods.

In recent years, juvenile great white sharks have become more common in the waters off local beaches because they have begun to use the California coast more as nursery habitat, said Chris Lowe, director of Cal State Long Beach’s Shark Lab. Swimmers are in the water with sharks more than they realize, researchers have said in recent years.

“The law will help reduce fisheries interactions with great white sharks and benefit protected sharks and marine users by reducing the risk of catching these sharks on public beaches and ocean piers where people swim, surf and dive.” , Lowe said in the announcement of the signing of the law.

Swimmer Steve Robles was bitten by a great white man during a long distance swim in 2014. The shark had broken loose from heavy equipment that had been dropped from the Manhattan Beach Pier, hooking and churning the sea creature – an incident caught on camera. Back then, fishermen said they would fish for rays.

Robles said he was unaware of the bill but had been vocal about the need for more regulation.

“They hope it doesn’t happen to anyone,” said Robles, who continues to compete in long-distance swimming. “It could have been easily avoided. That should not have happened.”

David McGuire, director of the non-profit Shark Stewards, said with the increase in shark populations and greater awareness of the species congregating near shore, there are anglers who are intentionally targeting the great white sharks.

Other near misses have been documented, and the use of mate and heavy fishing gear, including large hooks, long metal poles with a large hook at the end called gaffs, and highly tested fishing line, on public piers is common and has been well documented by the Shark Watch program of its Group, McGuire said.

In many cases, sharks are tired and excited, he said. Sometimes they were unintentionally hooked while fishing legally.

“Coupling near public beaches also attracts large sharks to recreational areas,” he said, “putting swimmers and surfers at risk.”

https://www.ocregister.com/2022/10/05/new-fishing-rules-aims-at-curbing-great-white-shark-hunting/ New fishing rules aim to curb great white shark hunting – Orange County Register

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