Mila Kunis raised $37 million for war refugee aid: ‘I’m so proud to be from Ukraine’

Mila Kunis is one of Individuals’ Individuals of the Year 2022 along with Quinta Brunson, Matthew McConaughey and Jennifer Hudson! Look for each of the four covers at newsstands this week, and read more about Kuni’s remarkable meeting below in the new issue. When it comes to settler tales, Mila Kunis’ is pretty much standard American history.

She was born in 1983 in the then Soviet city of Chernivtsi (located in modern-day Ukraine), where she and her family members, some enduring the Holocaust, saw others come together and experience movement against Semitism, persecution, and the lack of opportunity. Her grandfather firmly resisted the move until – in a Hollywood-worthy turn – he saw Disneyland.

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“His brother had moved to LA in the ’70s,” the 39-year-old entertainer and maker makes sense. “When my grandfather came to visit him, he took him with him, and that changed his perspective on the possible consequences of the West in every other place in the world. He returned to Russia and said: ‘We are leaving.’ ”

When Russian forces attacked Ukraine in February, Kunis – who moved to Los Angeles in 1991 at the age of 7 after her family received visas as strict displaced persons – could not imagine that she would be forced to flee. However, she knew the vulnerability that comes with leaving a home that you will likely never find again in the future.

Accordingly, she and her spouse Ashton Kutcher sent Stand With Ukraine, a GoFundMe that benefits flexport.org and airbnb.org, to associations that provide care and temporary shelter to millions of displaced people. To date, the work has raised more than $37 million — and the mission continues. “We must not become desensitized,” says Kunis, who contributed $3 million herself.

“Helping – never asking, just doing – should be our standard.” You have been a genuine supporter of Ukraine this year.

It’s interesting that you say “blunt”. I’ve generally looked at individuals who have been “open” rather than those who roam but do almost nothing.

This was one of the main situations in which I have at any point spoken out against humanity, on the grounds that there could not have been an alternative approach to cultivating this in this situation.

When we saw that Putin was stalking the whole country, we realized that an enormous emergency would result.

How could you be ready to activate the Stand With Ukraine pledge campaign so quickly? The advantage of the circumstances was that we lacked the opportunity and energy to think things over.

Being from Ukraine, I got calls from people who [wanted to help and] I thought I knew government affairs or had an understanding of NGOs [nongovernmental organizations] on the ground. That was my admission: if they don’t have the faintest idea who to turn to, how does anyone? There were problems that we realized we could help solve. So Ashton and I said, “Okay, let’s get this done.” Within 24 hours we had GoFundMe ready.

Was this a valuable opportunity to introduce her to her legacy — and reconnect with yours? My children would constantly grow up eating my mother’s food.

My parents and I communicate in Russian, so they grew up with it. They usually sensed pride in being half-Ukrainian. I’m actually an outspoken American.

I grew up in Los Angeles. All in all, I’ve never been happier to be from Ukraine. I am so respected that my children can carry on this legacy.

At the point where you are close to nothing, all you should do is acclimate. As horrific as these myriad things seem to be in this current reality, the “you’re unique, and that’s something cool” feel is new. I am grateful for that. President Zelenskyy gradually thanked you for your help and assurance.

But that wasn’t your most memorable meeting, right? A change from quite a while back [the Ukrainian series Worker of the People] was wanted in LA. I had an arrangement with ABC and I was trying desperately to get the show organized. We ended up being outbid, but I was chatting to this entertainer named Zelenskyy the whole time.

Years later I read the information and saw that Ukraine had a different President. I thought to myself, “A Jewish President? Mazel tov!

That name sounds so natural.’ I was checking my messages and I thought, ‘I know him!’ Our own little meeting – delightful. When you’re choosing activities to do—like Happiest Young Woman Alive this year, which you also starred in—do you and Ashton think of each other? I’m the sovereign to tease him all day. I am a web image!

On the off chance he’s on a zoom, I just walk over and jot down my question, sort of like “focus on me.” That’s the beauty of a shared office, by the way.

How would you and Ashton talk to your children about difficult world issues like this? [Our daughter] Wyatt is 8, and [our son] Dimitri is just 6 years old. Children’s brains, beautiful and rich as they are, are not equipped to process this amount of data at once. So we give them enough to figure out what’s going on on the planet without the intricacies.

Do you have any inkling that these two nations are at war? As a matter of fact. Do they realize that honest individuals bite the dust? As a matter of fact. Still, we don’t watch the news with them.

You don’t have to worry about the optics. We simply claim that they should realize that the world is bigger than them. Discovering this perspective is rarely too early.

But at the same time, there’s a part of you that needs to protect your child from things they don’t know are possible. Also, my girl is really tender.

At the point when we were reading Charlie and the Chocolate Production Line together, she said, “The kid is starving! Is there a good reason why they don’t care about him?” I thought, “Boy, you’re not prepared for this world.” Was this a valuable opportunity to introduce her to her legacy—and reconnect with yours associate? My children would constantly grow up eating my mother’s food. My parents and I communicate in Russian, so they grew up with it. They usually sensed pride in being half-Ukrainian.

I’m actually an outspoken American. I grew up in Los Angeles. All in all, I’ve never been happier to be from Ukraine.

I am so respected that my children can carry on this legacy. At the point where you are almost nothing, all you have to do is acclimatize.

As terrifying as such myriad things may be in this current reality, the “you’re unique, and that’s something cool” feel is new. I am grateful for that.

President Zelenskyy gradually expressed his gratitude for your help and assurance. In any case, that wasn’t your most memorable meeting, right? Some time ago a revision of [the Ukrainian series Worker of the People] was wanted in LA. I had an arrangement with ABC and I was trying desperately to get the show organized.

We ended up being outbid, but I was chatting to this entertainer named Zelenskyy the whole time. Years later I read the information and saw that Ukraine had a different president.

I thought to myself, “A Jewish President? Mazel tov! That name sounds so natural.” I was checking my messages and I was like, “I know him!”

Our own little meet-charming. When choosing projects to deliver – like Happiest Young Woman Alive this year, which you also starred in – do you and Ashton think of each other? I’m the sovereign to tease him all day. I am a web image!

On the off chance he’s on a zoom, I just walk over and jot down my request on paper, sort of like “focus on me.” Besides, that’s the nice thing about a shared office.

How would you both relax? We both like a glass of wine. Need a recording? Red? White? I love Stag’s Jump. I love the nocking point. I like Paso Robles. I’m not a bougie by any means.

I started drinking rich Chardonnays, which I later admitted was really messy. Obviously, a rich Chardonnay is an eye roll. But it’s like, “For you, man. It just tastes great.” I’m not an egoist.

What did you expect most in an extreme year? Besides wine? [Laughs] Legitimate answer, incredibly messy: my children.

You have this innate ability to show sympathy without being told. They really want to help without being asked. Kids today think more about the world than I was raised.

It makes them aware that their general environment is so much larger, and they get a better sense of what they can give. This age of great scholars will have an immense impact.

To help, visit gofundme.com/stand-with-ukraine

https://www.tvguidetime.com/people/mila-kunis-raised-37-million-for-war-refugee-relief-im-so-proud-to-be-from-ukraine-2-497768.html Mila Kunis raised $37 million for war refugee aid: ‘I’m so proud to be from Ukraine’

Adam Bradshaw

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